How Consumer Demand Shapes the Smartphone

November 3, 2016


When mobile phones first came out, they were enormous out of necessity. The power and technology needed to simply make a telephone call remotely was big in scale, simply because of what was available at the time. As the years passed and consumer acceptance grew, the demand for a smaller device drove the dimensions of the phone down so small that it was easy to lose between the sofa cushions. Once additional features began being added to the phone we saw the size grow again.

Today people use their phones as an all-in-one multimedia device. From taking photos and video to posting them to social networks and websites, people use their phones more than ever before. Many have even ditched their PCs and laptops completely, choosing to do their browsing, research, and shopping from their phone.

However with phones now outgrowing the pocket, many are wondering if and when they'll shrink back down again. The desire for a smaller device has prompted some consumers to make the bold move to ditch the phone altogether. As circuitry and antennae have gotten smaller, phone manufacturers have been able to install them into wearable devices like smart watches. Samsung's new Gear S3 Frontier is the first watch, which can work independently of the phone. Along with a slew of apps, the watch can make and receive both calls and texts. Though it lacks standard browsing and camera capabilities, all of the basics are there.

As the holidays approach, consumer buying power will dramatically shape the design of mobile devices in 2017. Chances are we will see a wider array of wearable mobile technology and the next wave may be able to replace smart phones altogether.

Security always has been and always will be a concern. Many wearable devices are linked to payment systems such as Apple Pay or Android pay using NFC technology. If you have concerns about the security of your employees wearable device, schedule a consultation with an AuditMacs security professional.